X
403.253.2059 5000 11 St SE, Calgary, AB T2H 2Y5

Charity Intelligence

Fund Contribution Sources

  • Individual
  • Community Organizations
  • Corporate
  • Food Industry
  • Foundations
Please refer to our annual report
for our financial statements.

Volunteer & Staff

  • Volunteers
  • Staff
215,195 work hours
2/3 of work hours are done by volunteers

Activities

Emergency Food Hampers

OUTPUTS
Emergency hampers provide clients in temporary emergency situations with one week’s worth of food and referrals to outside organizations. Food is provided to low-income and food insecure Calgarians. We connect clients with community resources that can address the underlying issues of food insecurity.

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
Relieving food insecurity and providing support for clients who are experiencing emergency situations. Alleviate the stress of wondering where the next meal is coming from.

Thank you very, very much. I think about the people who donate and the people who organize and distribute the food, and I feel so grateful. You have removed a whole lot of stress from my life. I feel so secured and cared for when my cupboards and fridge are full, as they are today because I picked up my food hamper. Words are not enough, but that is what I’m offering the CFB through this survey. You all have made such a difference for me to carry on today. I continue to look for work knowing I have your support and that I have enough to eat.Food Bank Client

25%

of clients are
referred to other
community agencies.

Creating a hunger-free community.

Around 60% of Food Bank clients indicated feeling tense or stressed out at least once or twice daily.

2013/2014

Hampers provided 49,607
Referrals to agencies 7,979
Clients helped by agencies*
17,203
Money saved** $13,173,140

 

2014/2015

Hampers provided 54,051
Referrals to agencies 7,650
Clients helped by agencies*
19,268
Money saved**
$14,211,340

 

2015/2016

Hampers provided 65,419
Referrals to agencies 7,920
Unique clients 67,891
Unique clients under 18
24,480
Clients helped by agencies*
22,859
Money saved**
$17,113,150

 
* Clients being helped by other agencies is the number of hampers referred to the Food Bank from other agencies.

**Money saved can be used to pay off debt, pay for rent, utilities, medical bills, childcare, etc. The money saved includes all emergency hampers and baby hampers. The estimated value of each hamper is as follows: Pink $180, Blue $270, Green $315, Purple $630, Orange $270 and Baby $50.

find out more about our emergency hamper program

Specialty Hampers

OUTPUTS
Specialty hampers are food hampers that are tailored to special circumstances, including infant and prenatal; celiac, renal, and welcome home hampers. This allows food insecure clients with dietary restrictions can access the Emergency Hamper program. The Calgary Food Bank collaborates with Alberta Health Services to determine an appropriate hamper content in order to meet medical dietary restrictions.

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
Relieving food insecurity and providing support for clients who are experiencing emergency situations. Alleviate the stress of wondering where the next meal is coming from. Clients with special dietary needs are able to access food resources.

LONG-TERM OUTCOMES
A hunger-free community.

TYPES OF HAMPERS
From 2013-2015 there were 4 types of specialty hampers, celiac, welcome home, pre-natal and baby. In 2016, renal hampers were added to the Specialty Hamper program.

Types of specialty hampers

2013/2014 4
2014/2015 4
2015/2016 5

 

Number of distributed hampers

2013/2014 5,434
2014/2015 5,988
2015/2016 6,478

 

Milk Program

OUTPUTS
Bulk milk is provided to agencies for distribution and provided to pregnant or nursing mothers, and children as part of the Emergency Hamper Program. Families with children receive extra milk.

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
Pregnant or nursing mothers receive daily recommended intake or milk or alternatives. All children are provided with milk according to Canada’s Food Guide, receiving the nutrients to sustain their growth and development. Agencies that are working with pre-school children and / or pregnant and nursing women receive milk from the Food Link program, and are not refused due to capacity limit.

LONG-TERM OUTCOMES
A hunger-free community.

Food Link provides us weekly with much needed eggs, milk, and ground beef. They also let us come by and pick up items like granola bars, cereal, vegetables, etc. basically anything that they have available at the time. We are really helped by Food Link. They make our weekly grocery bill more manageable. Food Link Agency
NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES (2015/2016)
15 Non-profit and
charitable agencies
working with pre-school children and/or nursing and pregnant women (includes both Children’s Milk and Food Link agencies).
24,483 children get
extra milk or formula.

2013/2014

Number of 2L milk cartons given out

Agencies working with pre-school children, pregnant and nursing women.
11,555
Families with children receive extra milk.
25,029
Children receive nutrients to sustain their growth and development.*
 2% Milk 65,929
3% Milk 7,679
Pregnant, nursing women and children receive milk.**
 2% Milk 4,715
3% Milk 6,890

 

2014/2015

Number of 2L milk cartons given out

Agencies working with pre-school children, pregnant and nursing women.
12,391
Families with children receive extra milk.
26,361
Children receive nutrients to sustain their growth and development.*  2% Milk 68,729
3% Milk 7,908
Pregnant, nursing women and children receive milk.**  2% Milk 5,178
3% Milk 8,297

 

2015/2016

Number of 2L milk cartons given out

Agencies working with pre-school children, pregnant and nursing women.
12,000
Families with children receive extra milk.
30,933
Children receive nutrients to sustain their growth and development.*  2% Milk 79,443
3% Milk 15,791
Pregnant, nursing women and children receive milk.**  2% Milk 10,449
3% Milk 11,305

 
* Cartons of milk distributed through the emergency hamper program.

**Milk distributed to agencies, through Food Link,  that are working with children and/or pregnant and nursing women.

find out more about our milk program

Hampers for the Homeless

OUTPUTS
The Calgary Food Bank collaborates with 17 non-profit agencies that are working with the homeless population. We supply those agencies with homeless hampers, allowing the agencies to focus on their programming. The hampers contain 2 to 3 days of ready to eat food, supplying those living rough with a food source. Homeless individuals are connected with service providers.

It helps to provide food to the hard to reach homeless and get connected to CMHA resources.  Agency Partner

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
Supplying nutrition to those living rough and may not have another source of food.

LONG-TERM OUTCOMES
A hunger-free community.

I was homeless for almost 4 years, during that time I was thankful for the homeless hampers that you provided. I lived at the YWCA for 2 years 9 months and I’m now in my own apartment. It wouldn’t be possible without all the help that I’ve been given and continue to receive. Food Bank Client
Homelessness puts a strain on both taxpayers and various social agencies costing the Canadian economy $7 Billion annually due to the cost of emergency shelters, social services, health care, and correction.

The Homeless Hub

On a given night, 3,430 Calgarians experience homelessness

The Calgary Homeless Foundation

Aboriginal people are over-represented in the homeless population. They make 3% of the Calgary population but make 20% of its homeless population.

2013/2014

Number of agencies 13
Number of bags distributed 17,108
Money saved*
$701, 428

 

2014/2015

Number of agencies 16
Number of bags distributed 16,735
Money saved*
$686, 135

 

2015/2016

Number of agencies 17
Number of bags distributed 15,981
Money saved*
$655,221

 

* Dollar value of hamper savings, allowing agencies focus on their programming rather than outsourcing food.

find out more about our hampers for the homeless program

Weekends and More Program

OUTPUTS
Food insecure children are provided with kid-friendly bags of food, given out by teachers, to support them over the weekends.

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
Meet the immediate hunger needs of food insecure children and reduce the occurrence of teachers paying for food for students. Teachers can focus on education instead of sourcing food. The most food insecure children are properly identified and provided with food. Reported by teachers, overall improvement in class participation,  academic performance, and concentration for children in the program.

LONG-TERM OUTCOMES
A hunger-free community.

Thank you for having a program to support our students.  It really makes a difference for students and families.Participating School
Improved class participation

79% tremendous amount
or quite a bit

Improved academic performance

59% tremendous amount
or quite a bit

Improved concentration

81% tremendous amount
or quite a bit

2013/2014

Number of bags distributed N/A
Number of schools N/A

 

2014/2015

Number of bags distributed 1,929
Number of schools 3

 

2015/2016

Number of bags distributed 5,059
Number of schools 10

 

Food insecurity is a serious health problem in Canada.

It is associated with poorer health, psychological, social, and emotional outcomes.
In Alberta, one in ten individuals experience food insecurity, with 17% children living in food insecure households.
The existence of food banks is becoming more important as the need for these facilities by families increases.

Activities

Regional Distribution

OUTPUTS
The Calgary Food Bank provides food to other Food Banks and charities across the Alberta and Canada. Emergency food and supplies are delivered to other Food Banks across Alberta. Supply additional resources to areas in Canada which are in need. Sharing bulk food with members of Food Banks Alberta based on their capacity and support regional partners by re-distributing food.

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
By collaborating with other food banks and charities, we ensure that emergency food and supplies are delivered where they are needed most, reaching more food insecure clients. The Calgary Food Bank re-distributes excessive amounts of certain items to other agencies which results in reduced food waste.

LONG-TERM OUTCOMES

Creating a
hunger-free
community.

2013/2014

Number of beneficiaries (Food Banks) 63
Pounds of food distributed 3,943,110
 Dollar value of food distributed* $7,886,220

 

2014/2015

Number of beneficiaries (Food Banks)
31
Pounds of food distributed 3,548,175
 Dollar value of food distributed* $7,096,350

 

2015/2016

Number of beneficiaries (Food Banks)
Over 35
Pounds of food distributed 3,130,689
Dollar value of food distributed* $6,261,378

 

* By collaborating with other food banks and charities, we ensure that emergency food and supplies are delivered where they needed most reaching more food insecure clients. Dollar value of food distributed through regional share.

find out more about regional distribution

Food Link

OUTPUTS
Bulk food and supplies are provided to partner agencies. Provide food and non-food items to non-profit and charitable organizations.

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
Support organizations by absorbing or diverting agencies’ food and supplies cost, agencies can focus on meeting the needs of the community instead of sourcing food. Money saved can be relocated to sustain existing programs or launch new programs.

Re-distribute excessive amounts of certain items to other agencies which results in reduced food waste. Ability to keep up with the demand of the programs and not refusing agencies due to capacity limit.

LONG-TERM OUTCOMES
A hunger-free community.

The Food Link program has significant positive impacts for all of the children, youth and families we serve.  Without access to the food link program our programs wouldn’t be be able to function at the capacity we do now.  When there is so many stressors in the lives of the people we serve, the idea that they can have a place to access free food is huge!  Many of our clients, especially the homeless rough sleepers, would not otherwise have access to food at all.  Especially fresh cooked meals.  We are forever grateful to the Food Link program for the valuable contributions to the Aboriginal community in Calgary.Agency Partner

2013/2014

Number of  programs*
145
Pounds of food distributed 3,727,593
Money saved** $7,455,186

 

2014/2015

Number of  programs* 186
Pounds of food distributed 3,159,433
 Money saved** $6,318,866

 

2015/2016

Number of  programs*
215
Pounds of food distributed 2,983,232
Money saved** $5,966,464

 

* Number of programs that access the Food Link in a given year.

** Dollar value of food distributed.

find out more about our food link program

Food Rescue

OUTPUTS
Rescuing viable food from retailers which would be otherwise thrown out. The Calgary Food Bank re-distributes rescued food to clients, non-profit agencies, charitable organizations and other Food Banks.

SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES
Reducing waste and increasing supply of goods available for Calgary Food Bank programming. Food is distributed in a more efficient way resulting in reduced food waste and increased purchasing power. The pounds of food re-distributed should ideally should equal to pounds of food rescued.

LONG-TERM OUTCOMES

Creating a
hunger-free
community.

2013/2014

Number of food industry partners* N/A
Pounds of food distributed 5,925,980
Value of food rescued** $11,851,960

 

2014/2015

Number of food industry partners* 292
Pounds of food distributed 5,707,188
Value of food rescued** $11,414,375

 

2015/2016

Number of food industry partners*
434
Pounds of food distributed 4,838,047
Value of food rescued** $9,676,094

 

*Food industry partners include retailers, wholesalers, producers, vendors and transportation companies.

** Dollar value of food rescued.

The Calgary Food Bank constantly collecting feedback from our clients, partner agencies, donors, and volunteers.
By asking questions and analyzing the responses, the Calgary Food Bank commits to continuous improvement.

find out more in our annual report

Presents data to readers that uses standardized or common metrics to assess key  program outputs. The charity may either present the metrics in the format used to report their metrics to the government, ministry, foundation, coalition, or other standards – setting organization, or may make the explicit claim that its metrics are based on such standards, without providing documentation.